Author Topic: The Hubbert's Arms International Cinema  (Read 25982 times)

graveday

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Re: The Hubbert's Arms International Cinema
« Reply #60 on: December 22, 2010, 02:52:23 PM »
And I too like films with artfully slow scenes. Tarkovsky, Antonioni, Jarmusch, Roy Andersson.

I am laughing at the mention of Jarmusch and my reaction to Stranger Than Paradise.  Agonizingly slow to the point where it seems the actors are going to explode.
Power concedes nothing without a demand.  Frederick Douglass

If we don't defend free speech, how will we know who's an asshole?

Progress is precarious.  MLK

You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline - it helps if you have some kind of a football team, or some nuclear weapons, but at the very least you need a beer.
--Frank Zappa

Gromit

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Re: The Hubbert's Arms International Cinema
« Reply #61 on: December 22, 2010, 03:31:07 PM »
And I too like films with artfully slow scenes. Tarkovsky, Antonioni, Jarmusch, Roy Andersson.

I am laughing at the mention of Jarmusch and my reaction to Stranger Than Paradise.  Agonizingly slow to the point where it seems the actors are going to explode.

To each his own, I guess. That's one of my favourite films of his.

Mild Spoiler Ahead
I find the slow scenes psychologically fascinating and perfectly depicting loneliness, senselessness, and lack of communication.
End of Spoiler

I do not enjoy these feelings in real life, but I do enjoy seeing them depicted on screen with keenness and finesse.

graveday

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Re: The Hubbert's Arms International Cinema
« Reply #62 on: December 22, 2010, 04:55:30 PM »
No, don't get me wrong.  I enjoyed it to, like pulling out a splinter.  Just kidding.  I remarked to myself that here was something new and fascinating.
Power concedes nothing without a demand.  Frederick Douglass

If we don't defend free speech, how will we know who's an asshole?

Progress is precarious.  MLK

You can't be a real country unless you have a beer and an airline - it helps if you have some kind of a football team, or some nuclear weapons, but at the very least you need a beer.
--Frank Zappa

Highlander

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Re: The Hubbert's Arms International Cinema
« Reply #63 on: December 22, 2010, 11:44:56 PM »
If you like your manga, then check out Princess Mononoke - utterly weird, totally compelling


« Last Edit: December 22, 2010, 11:55:34 PM by Highlander »
And there are never really endings, happy or otherwise. Things keep going on, they overlap and blur, your story is part of your sister's story is part of many other stories, and there is no telling where any of them may lead.

annieokra

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Re: The Hubbert's Arms International Cinema
« Reply #64 on: December 23, 2010, 01:51:01 AM »
Jaysus, there's a lot of films I know nothing about. Need to get to the local arthouse cinema more often.
Not a lot to contribute here, feel like a hayseed.
I did like The Committments a lot;  loved La Vie en Rose, Michael Collins, Slumdog Millionaire, Amelie and Rabbit Proof Fence. And Waking Ned Devine.
I loved that.
 

saltine

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Re: The Hubbert's Arms International Cinema
« Reply #65 on: December 23, 2010, 10:25:12 AM »
If anybody wants to watch The Devil's Backbone, the entire movie is available (for now anyway) on YT.
  
(You can watch it on playlist mode by clicking on the title - the YT page will have a link to the playlist which can't be embedded here).

« Last Edit: December 23, 2010, 11:27:13 AM by saltine »

saltine

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Re: The Hubbert's Arms International Cinema
« Reply #66 on: December 23, 2010, 10:34:38 AM »
Yay!  Also found Let the Right One In.  No playlist available and embedding is disabled.  Just click on the title.



Hurry and watch - some movies get removed by YT or whoever...

saltine

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Re: The Hubbert's Arms International Cinema
« Reply #67 on: December 23, 2010, 11:04:39 AM »
Forgot about the Norwegian film Elling.  

Just a clip:


Edit: OK, I'm done for now.  ;D
« Last Edit: December 23, 2010, 11:06:49 AM by saltine »

TheWarriorMax

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Re: The Hubbert's Arms International Cinema
« Reply #68 on: December 23, 2010, 11:11:52 AM »
It's been mentioned in passing, here's the pivotal scene from The Road Warrior. Alongside the Holy Bible, the main guide for the formative years of my life...

<object width="800" height="400"> <param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/F4xs5FDHu2E&fs=1&start="></param> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param> <embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/F4xs5FDHu2E&fs=1&start=" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="800" height="400" wmode="transparent"></embed></object>

Greetings from the Humungous,
The lord Humungous!
The warrior of the wasteland,
The Ayatollah of Rock n Roll-ah...

Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior: coming soon to YOUR NEIGHBOURHOOD!

"And how can a man die better,
than facing fearful odds,
for the ashes of his fathers,
and the temples of his gods".
Lays of Ancient Rome by Lord Macaulay

slow_dazzle

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Re: The Hubbert's Arms International Cinema
« Reply #69 on: December 23, 2010, 12:12:51 PM »
I have "The Devil's Backbone" as part of a boxed set - the others are "Pan's Labyrinth" and "Cronos". All three are good films.

Three others that I have:

Uzak (Beautiful and melancholy)



The White Ribbon (Excellent study of small town authoritarianism)



La Haine (Violent but for a good purpose)

“It is clear that there is, within Scotland, more of a shared vision and values - a vision of the country, the society, politics, the role of the state; values like fairness, equity, and opportunity."

Professor Joseph Stiglitz, Sunday Herald, 14.09.14

Highlander

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Re: The Hubbert's Arms International Cinema
« Reply #70 on: December 23, 2010, 12:24:00 PM »
Aye, I had La Haine back on page 1  ;)

Sex Mission


Polish Doomer Sci Fi Comedy of the highest order  ;D
And there are never really endings, happy or otherwise. Things keep going on, they overlap and blur, your story is part of your sister's story is part of many other stories, and there is no telling where any of them may lead.

Gromit

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Re: The Hubbert's Arms International Cinema
« Reply #71 on: December 23, 2010, 02:25:11 PM »
Now that we're back to Sci-Fi, here are a few interesting...

French Science Fiction Films

3 films by Enki Bilal (out of the 3 he has made so far!):
Bunker Palace Hôtel (1989)
Tykho Moon (1996)
Immortel (ad vitam) (2004)
They are all rather bizarre but very artistic.

La jetée (1962)
Director: Chris Marker. This is the short film that inspired Twelve Monkeys. Filmed as a sequence of photographs. Strange and unforgettable.

Eden Log (2007)
Dir: Franck Vestiel. Strange film, but I liked it (much more than its ratings would suggest).

Chrysalis (2007)
Dir: Julien Leclercq. Crime thriller with SF underpinnings. I found it complex but neat.

La soupe aux choux (1981) (aka The cabbage soup)
Director: Jean Girault. One of the last films with Louis de Funès, also starring Jean Carmet and Jacques Villeret. More a comedy than SF, but it's nice either way.

Barbarella (1968)
Dir: Roger Vadim

La cité des enfants perdus (aka The City of Lost Children) (1995)
Directors: Marc Caro, Jean-Pierre Jeunet. Absolutely delightful.

I also love their Delicatessen (1991) but it's not exactly Sci-Fi.

And if you're wondering why I haven't mentioned Alphaville, well, that's because I have this medical condition known as Godard-intolerance.

slow_dazzle

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Re: The Hubbert's Arms International Cinema
« Reply #72 on: December 23, 2010, 02:32:06 PM »
I'll mail this to axis09 Gromit - he's a big sci-fi fan.

As for Godard...eeyuk. His films leave me thinking "WTF was it about?"+

I have a liking for European film in general. It is entirely different from the insidious perception management glitzy, small-bang-wallop nonsense that comes out of the Hollywood system. Good film is such a beautiful, soul and life enriching medium.

Excellent thread, full of new material to many of us.
“It is clear that there is, within Scotland, more of a shared vision and values - a vision of the country, the society, politics, the role of the state; values like fairness, equity, and opportunity."

Professor Joseph Stiglitz, Sunday Herald, 14.09.14

Dystopia

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Re: The Hubbert's Arms International Cinema
« Reply #73 on: December 23, 2010, 03:06:28 PM »
Thank you everyone!!!
I now have a whole new list of movies to watch;D

We recently watched Atanarjuat - The Fast Runner and loved it

Far North

tubenosedfruitbat

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Re: The Hubbert's Arms International Cinema
« Reply #74 on: December 23, 2010, 03:24:03 PM »
Anything by Ildiko Enyedi, Hungarian director:
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0258221/

The Magic Hunter is fabulous, and has the World's Best Sex Scene;D
Simon the Magician is also wonderful; it's set in Paris.